“Gun Control” and the Ancient Greeks and Romans

Should weapons be carried in public places? What connections can we make between the ancient world and our second amendment?

greek-weapons

Check out this blog post by David Meadows.

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4 thoughts on ““Gun Control” and the Ancient Greeks and Romans

  1. This article was about the banning of carrying weapons in public areas because others were dominated by the ones carrying the weapons and also physical risks were set as well. One of the weapons could have fired at any moment and that would be scary. That is the reason that they banned the carrying of weapons in public areas. I learned that this Roman banning also led to other civilizations banning the carrying of weapons. I also learned about how the people were like militias and that also gave ideas for the American Revolution and the English. This was a very interesting story and it has a lot to do with what is happening right now.

  2. This article discusses how the second amendment was based on the Greek beliefs that one could have a gun for self defense, but it was not necessary for everyone to own a gun. In the Greek times, only the wealthy men would own guns because they would be in the military, where you had to buy your own weapon and armor. I find it interesting that one of our amendments was based on the Greek beliefs because the greeks believed that the guns should go away once the soilders go back to daily life, which is a little different than our laws today. I also find it interesting that Benjamin Franklin was the person who suggested that the second amendment follow the greek beliefs. If we had fully followed the greeks view on guns, where they were to be put away after battle or practice and they weren’t allowed in homes, I think we wouldn’t have such a controversial issue. But, I think that it is too late to change the amendment now because many people own guns and are set on using them. The Greeks had a very good philosophy on guns , which I believe we should have followed from the get go, but it is too late to change it now.

  3. So this article is discussing weapon control in ancient Rome. Like today, how we are debating gun control, they debated weapon control in public places. One thing that the Greeks said was “let the laws rule alone. When weapons rule, they kill the law.” The Romans had a different view, however, and they banned the carrying of weapons in the pomerium, or the sacred boundary of the city. Eventually, however the Athenians also lay aside their weapons, and weapon control became the norm in ancient culture.

  4. The Greek and Romans were the ones who inspired the English and American revolutionaries with their citizen militias. However, the both the Greeks and Romans had to refrain from carrying their weapons in public spaces, such as the forum. In some particular places, it was just custom that they did not carry weapons. In other places, it was the law.
    The reason for this was because it was thought that carrying weapons at home would lead to letting weapons rule instead of the law. For example, some Greek legislators from the school of Pythagoras said: “Let the laws rule alone. When weapons rule, they kill the law.” This is the opposite view of the Chief Executive of the NRA, Wayne LaPierre. He says that “the guys with the guns make the rules. However, the classical practices that inspired the American Founding Fathers.
    The reason for this rule was an idea that civilization could not accept public spaces that were controlled by those wearing weapons. It is almost impossible for the people without weapons to argue with the people with weapons … Maybe we should learn a good lesson from the Greeks and Romans.

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